Your Health

Your Health

Posts on Diseases

For Women: A Heart-to-Heart Talk

Knowledge about gender differences in heart disease can help you protect your health 

When you think about the steps that women can take to safeguard their health, which ones come to mind? Mammograms? Pap smears?

As important as those tests are, thinking about your ticker is just as crucial. “It’s a common misconception that cancer is the most serious problem for women to worry about, but heart disease is the No. 1 killer in America,” says cardiologist Peter Hui, M.D., a cardiologist and Brown & Toland physician with the California Pacific Medical Center. 

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Are You Smart About Men’s Health?

Take this quiz—no matter your gender—to test your knowledge about common medical issues facing today’s men and health-promoting strategies

1.    True or False: Most men fail to see their physician annually for preventive checkups.
True. According to a survey by the CDC, 22.6 percent of men have not seen their physician in the past year. And men are half as likely as women to go to the doctor over a 2-year period, despite the fact that prompt, pre-emptive care can be a major contributor toward good health and long life.

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Adults, Be Smart About Your Annual Physical

With the new year approaching, it's prime time to safeguard your health

Never underestimate the benefits of your annual checkup: It’s your chance as a patient to get one solid block of time alone with your doctor, when you can ask all the questions about your health that you’re wondering about and get a personalized care plan that can keep you healthy. According to some medical experts, those annual visits also improve the detection of early illness, which could help prevent complications down the line.

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Why Do Elephants Rarely Get Cancer?

Researchers say the answer lies in the genes. Can humans devise a similar solution? 

Elephants can boast a long list of credits to their fame: They’re the largest land-based animals on Earth; their memory rivals that of dolphins, apes and humans; and most intriguingly, they rarely get cancer. This last fact has puzzled scientists for decades, but now, they might have an answer.

According to a study published in JAMA, elephants have 20 copies of a tumor-suppressing gene called TP53. By comparison, humans have only one copy of the gene.

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